Waffles Writes

A nanowrimo blog to post my writing and reblog some helpful stuff

replacements for ableist language

reverseracism:

kimsjongin:

Asinine
Bad
Bleak
Boring
Bullish
Callous
Careless
Confusing
Contemptible
Coward
Crappy
Dense
Devoid of _____
Disgusting
Dull
Enraged
Evil
Extremist
Furious
Gross
Half-hearted
Horrible
Ignoramus
Ignorant
Impolite
Inane
Incomprehensible
Inconsiderate

Post on some alternatives to Ableist language

(via 20863)

clevergirlhelps:

tonkinrpa:


Guide To Torturing Someone

Below the cut is a guide to the art of torture for anyone playing a character who needs or wants to torture another, or anyone who’s simply interested. I, in no way, condone the replication of anything in this post in real life. This is exclusively for writing purposes. Do not try at home. 

Triggers: Violence

Read More

Updated link

clevergirlhelps:

tonkinrpa:

Guide To Torturing Someone

Below the cut is a guide to the art of torture for anyone playing a character who needs or wants to torture another, or anyone who’s simply interested. I, in no way, condone the replication of anything in this post in real life. This is exclusively for writing purposes. Do not try at home. 

Triggers: Violence

Read More

Updated link

(via thewritingcafe)

replacements for ableist language

reverseracism:

kimsjongin:

Asinine
Bad
Bleak
Boring
Bullish
Callous
Careless
Confusing
Contemptible
Coward
Crappy
Dense
Devoid of _____
Disgusting
Dull
Enraged
Evil
Extremist
Furious
Gross
Half-hearted
Horrible
Ignoramus
Ignorant
Impolite
Inane
Incomprehensible
Inconsiderate

Post on some alternatives to Ableist language

(via 20863)


So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPSHow to generate a map in Photoshop (video)How to create (mountain) brushes (video)How to create trees (video)How to create mountains and hills (video)How to create swamps and deserts (video) Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2) Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4) 
CITIESCity Map GeneratorClevergirlhelps’ Brilliant Post on City PlanningThewritingcafe’s Brilliant Post on City PlanningStreets VS MonumentsHow to create a grid in PhotoshopCity BrushesCities to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)MISC.Ship PlansHow Geography Affects ClimateHow Streets Evolve as Cities GrowHistory of Building MaterialsClimatesR. Steves’ Europe (Videos) NEED A NAME? Location and Setting name generatorPirate Ship name generatorShip name generator

So maybe you’re a writer or maybe you’re in a fantasy RP group, maybe you just want to make maps. Either way, with the right guidance the process is pretty easy. Here’s some Photoshop and research resources I’ve compiled to make your life easier.

WORLD MAPS
How to generate a map in Photoshop (video)
How to create (mountain) brushes 
(video)
How to create trees 
(video)
How to create mountains and hills 
(video)
How to create swamps and deserts 
(video)
Tolkien-Style Map Brushes (1)(2)
Parchment Textures (1)(2)(3)
Calthyechild’s Fantasy Map Tutorial & Resources
World Maps to inspire you (1)(2)(3)(4)

(Source: elizaabennet, via fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment)

thewritingcafe:

Basics:

Sub-genres: 
Alien Invasion: Involves aliens who invade Earth (usually).
Alternate History: Just as the name suggests, this genre deals with alternate histories. This can include traveling back in time, changing something, and returning to the changed future (such as Back to the Future).
Apocalyptic/Post-apocalyptic: This genre deals with the “end of the world” or what happens after such an event.
Artificial Intelligence: Involves artificial intelligence, usually one that becomes more “human”.
Astronaut: Deals with astronauts, often those who run into aliens or other disasters in space. The characters often die or disappear.
Biopunk: This genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
Cyberpunk: Involves a cyberworld or A.I. and is often set in the near-future. Blade Runner is a good example.
Detective: A cross-over between detective fiction and science fiction.
Dystopian: Dystopians are often “false utopians”, but underneath there is suffering.
Environmental: This genre focuses on the environment and threats against it.
Generation Ship: In which a society lives entirely on a ship and has been there for generations. They often know nothing of outside worlds. The ship in Wall-E is an example.
Gothic Sci-fi: Science fiction with a horror element. Think Frankenstein.
Hard Sci-fi: This genre pays special attention to scientific detail and accuracy.
Humor: This genre is light and humorous.
Kaiju: This is a Japanese sub-genre that involves a large monster as the antagonist.
Lost Worlds: As the name suggests, this genre has lost worlds or mysterious places. Lost is a prime example.
Military Sci-fi: Self-explanatory. Deals with war and military elements in a science fiction setting.
Multiverse: Involves many universes.
Robot: Involves robots as the main focus of the story.
Soft Sci-fi: This sub-genre does not put too much emphasis on scientific accuracy or detail.
Space Opera: Features adventures in space, such as Star Wars.
Steampunk: Involves Victorian-like settings with high technology.
Superhuman: Involves making humans superhuman or giving them extra abilities.
Time Travel: Self-explanatory.
Utopian: The opposite of dystopian, though characters may still see problems with this type of society. Utopians are ideal societies.
Western Sci-fi: Science fiction with Western elements (as in the Wild West). An example is Firefly.
Word Counts:
Hard Sci-fi: 90k - 100k
Space Opera: 90k - 120k
General: 80k - 115k
Middle Grade Sci-fi: 30k - 75k

Setting:
Most sci-fi takes place in the future or the near-future. Where does yours take place? Why does it take place in that time period? Once you know when it takes place, figure out the society. You’ll need to know how society got to that point and why. Was there a war? Did one country become two because of that?
Other than the time period you’ll need the actual setting. Does it take place in space? On a planet? Where on that planet? Or does the setting change because of travel?
Science:
The less you know about science, the softer your sci-fi will be. Take what subject you know most about (biology, chemistry, ecology, etc.) and use that for most of the science stuff, as long as your confident in your knowledge. However, keep it general and broad.
Technology advances more and more each day, much more than it did one hundred years ago. Establish the technology of your world and how quickly it evolves. Decide what is common place and what is rather new. Do only certain people get certain technologies? Why?
With more advances in science comes better medicine and probably longer life. Think about how long your characters are likely to live and establish what medicines are available (like if there is a cure for cancer or if certain diseases have been completely wiped out).
More:
Are We Going Somewhere Nice?
Time, Distance, and Cost in Science Fiction
Making Believable Future Technologies
Magic and Science Fiction
Time and Holidays
Axial Tilt
The Edge of Thought
Putting the Science in Your Science Fiction
How to be Memorably Wrong in Science Fiction
Putting Your Stars in Their Places
Animals in Science Fiction
Ten Laws of Good Science Fiction
Writing Science Fiction Articles
How to Write Science Fiction
5 Tips for Writing Science Fiction
World Building Links
World Building in Science Fiction
World Building for Sci Fi
How to Write Good Science Fiction
How to Write Science Fiction
Reading:
Best Dystopian and Post-apocalyptic Books
Upcoming Books of 2012 and 2013
Best Steampunk Books
Top 100 SF
Best SF with a Female Protagonist
Non-White Protagonists in SF, Fantasy, Horror, and Paranormal Romance
Underrated SF
Best Erotic SF

thewritingcafe:

Basics:

Sub-genres

  • Alien Invasion: Involves aliens who invade Earth (usually).
  • Alternate History: Just as the name suggests, this genre deals with alternate histories. This can include traveling back in time, changing something, and returning to the changed future (such as Back to the Future).
  • Apocalyptic/Post-apocalyptic: This genre deals with the “end of the world” or what happens after such an event.
  • Artificial Intelligence: Involves artificial intelligence, usually one that becomes more “human”.
  • Astronaut: Deals with astronauts, often those who run into aliens or other disasters in space. The characters often die or disappear.
  • Biopunk: This genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
  • Cyberpunk: Involves a cyberworld or A.I. and is often set in the near-future. Blade Runner is a good example.
  • Detective: A cross-over between detective fiction and science fiction.
  • Dystopian: Dystopians are often “false utopians”, but underneath there is suffering.
  • Environmental: This genre focuses on the environment and threats against it.
  • Generation Ship: In which a society lives entirely on a ship and has been there for generations. They often know nothing of outside worlds. The ship in Wall-E is an example.
  • Gothic Sci-fi: Science fiction with a horror element. Think Frankenstein.
  • Hard Sci-fi: This genre pays special attention to scientific detail and accuracy.
  • Humor: This genre is light and humorous.
  • Kaiju: This is a Japanese sub-genre that involves a large monster as the antagonist.
  • Lost Worlds: As the name suggests, this genre has lost worlds or mysterious places. Lost is a prime example.
  • Military Sci-fi: Self-explanatory. Deals with war and military elements in a science fiction setting.
  • Multiverse: Involves many universes.
  • Robot: Involves robots as the main focus of the story.
  • Soft Sci-fi: This sub-genre does not put too much emphasis on scientific accuracy or detail.
  • Space Opera: Features adventures in space, such as Star Wars.
  • Steampunk: Involves Victorian-like settings with high technology.
  • Superhuman: Involves making humans superhuman or giving them extra abilities.
  • Time Travel: Self-explanatory.
  • Utopian: The opposite of dystopian, though characters may still see problems with this type of society. Utopians are ideal societies.
  • Western Sci-fi: Science fiction with Western elements (as in the Wild West). An example is Firefly.

Word Counts:

  • Hard Sci-fi: 90k - 100k
  • Space Opera: 90k - 120k
  • General: 80k - 115k
  • Middle Grade Sci-fi: 30k - 75k

Setting:

  • Most sci-fi takes place in the future or the near-future. Where does yours take place? Why does it take place in that time period? Once you know when it takes place, figure out the society. You’ll need to know how society got to that point and why. Was there a war? Did one country become two because of that?
  • Other than the time period you’ll need the actual setting. Does it take place in space? On a planet? Where on that planet? Or does the setting change because of travel?

Science:

  • The less you know about science, the softer your sci-fi will be. Take what subject you know most about (biology, chemistry, ecology, etc.) and use that for most of the science stuff, as long as your confident in your knowledge. However, keep it general and broad.
  • Technology advances more and more each day, much more than it did one hundred years ago. Establish the technology of your world and how quickly it evolves. Decide what is common place and what is rather new. Do only certain people get certain technologies? Why?
  • With more advances in science comes better medicine and probably longer life. Think about how long your characters are likely to live and establish what medicines are available (like if there is a cure for cancer or if certain diseases have been completely wiped out).

More:

Reading:

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Dialogue and the “said” rule

referenceforwriters:

By  Martyn V. Halm

The main reason for the ‘said’ rule, is that 'said' is invisible

If you write a whole page of dialogue, readers need to be able to distinguish between the speakers.

There are several ways of doing that:

  • Action tag: Peter threw the mug across the kitchen. “Don’t ever talk to me that way again.”
  • Name of the character in the dialogue: “Don’t ever talk to me that way again, Mary.”
  • Distinctive speech pattern: “D-don’t ever talk to m-me that way again.”
  • Inserting ‘stop’ words particular to the character. “Like, you know, don’t talk ever talk to me that way again, you know?”
  • Dialect: “Don’ evah talk t’me them way agin.”
  • Emphasize the words: “Don’t. Ever. Talk. To. Me. That. Way. Again.”

If you need to add a speech tag, ‘Peter said’ is pretty invisible. It’s similar to a stage direction: 

(Peter:) Don’t ever talk to me that way again.

The other part of the rule is that novice writers are tempted to pimp up their speech tags instead of the dialogue.

"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter hissed.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter threatened.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter yelled.
"Don’t ever talk to me that way again," Peter bellowed.

If you need to increase the impact of a dialogue and you cannot think of a way to change the dialogue, adding an action tag is better than changing the speech tag from ‘said’ to ‘threatened’.

The twinkle disappeared from Peter’s eyes and he stepped closer. His voice was low, almost a growl. “Don’t ever talk to me that way again.”

If you need to make a point quickly, yes, you can use a different speech that from said. I believe in the “you can do anything you want” in writing. However, use it moderatively. 

Every rule can be broken, but most can be circumvented. The best advice is to use both as best as you can. 

Here’s another post that can illustrate this even further.

Again, you can do anything you want. 

(via writeworld)

audreyheckburn:

“There are two qualities that make fiction. One is the sense of mystery and the other is the sense of manners. You get the manners from the texture of existence that surrounds you. The great advantage of being a Southern writer is that we don’t have to go anywhere to look for manners; bad or good, we’ve got them in abundance. We in the South live in a society that is rich in contradiction, rich in irony, rich in contrast, and particularly rich in its speech”                                                                                 -Flannery O'Connor

N O V E L S / N O V E L L A S
Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
Beloved by Toni Morrison
A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
God’s Little Acre by Erskine Caldwell
Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Light in August by William Faulkner
Look Homeward, Angel by Thomas Wolfe
The Neon Bible by John Kennedy Toole
The Night of the Hunter by Davis Grubb
The Optimist’s Daughter by Eudora Welty
Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote
Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy
Sanctuary by William Faulkner
Sartoris by William Faulkner
The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Tobacco Road by Erskine Caldwell
The Violent Bear It Away by Flannery O’Connor
Wise Blood by Flannery O’Connor
S H O R T  S T O R I E S
A Good Man Is Hard to Find By Flannery O’Connor
A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner
Barn Burning by William Faulkner
The Flowers by Alice Walker
Kneel to the Rising Sun by Erskine Caldwell
Mountain Victory by William Faulkner
The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County by Mark Twain
Why I Live at the P.O. by Eudora Welty
P O E T R Y
Southern Gothic by Rickey Laurentiis
Playing Dead by Andrew Hudgins

audreyheckburn:

“There are two qualities that make fiction. One is the sense of mystery and the other is the sense of manners. You get the manners from the texture of existence that surrounds you. The great advantage of being a Southern writer is that we don’t have to go anywhere to look for manners; bad or good, we’ve got them in abundance. We in the South live in a society that is rich in contradiction, rich in irony, rich in contrast, and particularly rich in its speech”                                                  
                               -Flannery O'Connor
N O V E L S / N O V E L L A S

S H O R T  S T O R I E S

P O E T R Y

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Writing Traumatic Injuries References

alatar-and-pallando:

So, pretty frequently writers screw up when they write about injuries. People are clonked over the head, pass out for hours, and wake up with just a headache… Eragon breaks his wrist and it’s just fine within days… Wounds heal with nary a scar, ever…

I’m aiming to fix…

(via aliquid-de-magis)

Dwale, the medieval anesthetic

compoundfractur:

Modern anesthesia didn’t come into practice until around the mid-1800’s with the rediscovery of the properties of ether (Paracelsus had used it long before, but no one cared). Before ether came on the scene, people had to just “bite the bullet” and endure the pain of surgery, probably with some swigs of booze to take the edge off. In medieval England there were recipes for an anesthetic that were commonly circulated to “make a man sleep whilst men cut him.” The interesting thing about this drink, called Dwale, is that it was probably just as dangerous as surgery in pre-sanitation/antibiotic era medicine. Take a look at the recipe:

image

“How to make a drink that men call dwale to make a man sleep whilst men cut him: take three spoonfuls of the gall [bile] of a barrow swine [boar] for a man, and for a woman of a gilt [sow], three spoonfuls of hemlock juice, three spoonfuls of wild neep [bryony], three spoonfuls of lettuce, three spoonfuls of pape [opium], three spoonfuls of henbane, and three spoonfuls of eysyl [vinegar], and mix them all together and boil them a little and put them in a glass vessel well stopped and put thereof three spoonfuls into a potel of good wine and mix it well together.

When it is needed, let him that shall be cut sit against a good fire and make him drink thereof until he fall asleep and then you may safely cut him, and when you have done your cure and will have him awake, take vinegar and salt and wash well his temples and his cheekbones and he shall awake immediately.”

The bile was typically mixed with fat to help break up the ingredients and make them easier to absorb. Hemlock is the most recognizable ingredient on the list, and the most deadly (1 mL of hemlock juice can kill a person). It acts by blocking acetylcholine receptors in the nervous system, causing paralysis and blocking sensory impulses eventually causing respiratory failure. Bryony was used as a purgative in medieval England. Mandrake is also toxic. It acts like atropine, blocking muscarinic receptors. It also crosses the blood-brain barrier and induces sleepiness and hallucinations. The lettuce juice was thought to induce sleepiness. Opium obviously blocked pain. Henbane acts like mandrake, and induces a long period of unconsciousness. The vinegar, well, that woke the patient up (think smelling salts).

As you can see, there are some very dangerous ingredients. There’s speculation that dwale wasn’t as dangerous as it seems. The roots grown further north are often less potent than those grown closer to the equator (like in Greece, were hemlock killed Socrates). Boiling the ingredients also possibly detoxified them. Since the patient only had to drink enough until the passed out it’s not likely they ingested enough to poison themselves but we can’t know for sure.

(Source: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, via fixyourwritinghabits)

Anonymous said: How do you write a action scene?

bookgeekconfessions:

I have posted a bunch of tips about that. :-)

#40: Ten Tips For Writing Good Action Scenes.
#50: Writing Action. Part 1.

#51: Writing Action. Part 2.
#60:Writing Action Scenes

#96: How To Write A War or Battle Scene in Your Novel
#120:Fight Scenes and Love Scenes – Seven Tips to Writing Action
#121: Writing Realistic Injuries

Anonymous said: I have a question, I'm wondering how to write a fight between two people using their fists. How do they defend themselves what are the right movements? I just wonder what is needed to be taken into account to write such a scene. I'm sorry if this has been answered before.

howtofightwrite:

Don’t be sorry! Writing about fighting when you have no practical experience is a difficult challenge and writing fight sequences when you do is still time consuming. There are a lot pieces working together and figuring out how they function is difficult and something very few writers actually do well.

Here are a list some of our posts that may be helpful to you:

Five Simple Ways to Write Convincing Fight Sequences

Fight Write: A Basic Upper Body Primer (Open Hand)

Fight Write: A Basic Upper Body Primer (Fists)

Fight Write: The Art of Stepping

Fight Write: The Art of Blocking

Tip: Fights Start for a Reason

ObsidianMichi’s Real World Fight Facts

Fight Write: The Only Unfair Fight is the One You Lose Part 1

The Only Unfair Fight is the One You Lose Part 2 (Brutality)

Unusual Martial Art: Street Fighting

Fight Write: Art, Sport, Subdual, and Lethality

Also check anything in our Michael Janich tag, he is a very good instructor who teaches self-defense. I refer people to his videos for the work he does with concepts, where he actively explains what a technique is, what it does, and why it’s used before teaching the technique. As a writer, you need both technique and concept before you can put it on the page.

I plan on doing a write up on both elbows and knees in the near future. There’s a lot of misconceptions about how these techniques work.

Also check out Tamora Pierce’s Tortall series particularly First Test and Page in The Protector of the Small quartet. Tamora Pierce is one of the few authors that write fight scenes I feel comfortable recommending for reference.

Good hunting!

-Michi

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

image

BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

image

AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

image

AND STILL MORE

image

image

SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

image

PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

(via bilvee)

Is This Just Fantasy?: LGBTQ+ Speculative Fiction

diversityinya:

Speculative fiction has remained a fairly white, cis-gendered, & straight world for a long time.  The fact that there seem to be more dragons and robots than LGBTQ+ characters in fantasy & sci-fi novels is shameful and disheartening, especially to the genres’ LGBTQ+ fans.  So in celebration of LGBT Pride Month, I set out to overview the current status of LGBTQ+ representation in young adult fantasy and science fiction.

A great list of YA SF/F books with LGBTQ characters from YALSA’s The Hub!

(via weneeddiversebooks)

fleeing-the-horde:

The 13 Most Common Errors on a Novel’s First Page

boazpriestly:

  • Over-explanation. This includes prologues. “Prologues are never needed. You can usually throw them in the garbage. They’re usually put on as a patch.”
  • Too much data. “You’re trying to seduce your reader, not burden them,” Friedman said.
  • Over-writing, or “trying too hard.” “We think the more description we add, the more vivid it will be; but we don’t want to be distracted from the story” we open the book for.
  • Beginning the novel with an interior monologue or reflection. Usually this is written as the thoughts of a character who is sitting alone, musing and thinking back on a story. Just start with the story.
  • Beginning the novel with a flashback. Friedman isn’t entirely anti-flashback, but the novel’s opening page is the wrong place for one.
  • Beginning a novel with the “waking up sequence” of a character waking, getting out of bed, putting on slippers, heading for the kitchen and coffee…a cliche
  • Related cliche: beginning the novel with an alarm clock or a ringing phone
  • Starting out with an “ordinary day’s routine” for the main character
  • Beginning with “crisis moments” that aren’t unique: “When the doctor said ‘malignant,’ my life changed forever…” or “The day my father left us I was seven years old…”
  • Don’t start with a dialogue that doesn’t have any context. Building characterization through dialogue is okay anywhere else but there.
  • Starting with backstory, or “going back, then going forward.”
  • Info dump. More formally called “exposition.”
  • Character dump, which is four or more characters on the first page.

(via thewritingcafe)